AoA Integrated Art

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In the Academy of Arts, teachers and students work together to integrate digital, visual, and performing arts into the curriculum. Here are just a few examples of current projects.

Digital Arts Class:

The Academy of Arts Channel

See the finished productions: The Academy of Arts Channel

Sophomores in Mr. Sherman’s Digital
 Arts Class are publishing short video pieces designed to simulate a real
television network, and publishing their work to Youtube on their
 class “channel.”

Spots cover student interest stories,
drawing on News, Features, Sports and Leisure, Academy of Arts
Update, Arts and Entertainment, Advertising, and Public Service 
Announcements.

Students work in departments of
 three to six pupils. They generally divide the work: script, storyboard,
soundtrack and effects, camera, lights and audio, and video editing 
among the group members.

Students shoot HD with Canon
Vixia digital camcorders. The
 studio lighting, microphones, and greenscreen help to create a professional feel to the newscasts, allowing
 them to place logos and photos in the background of the set.

Groups edit their videos using
 Final Cut Express, an economical version of the professional industry
standard, Final Cut Pro.

Humanities

Shadow Portraits

The Northwest Studies classes created shadow portraits during the second term. The shadow portrait was a popular art form starting in the early 18th Century and continuing until the late 19 th Century and the age of the camera. In the period of westward expansion into the Oregon Territory, setters attempted to maintain some of the traditions of their former lives.

Students experimented with variation of detail while creating the shadow portraits. Many were struck with the ability of these images to convey the personality and nature of the subjects. The shadow portraits were juxtaposed with the Partner Image Project done in the Language Art classes. The study of humanities attempts to answer the most basic questions about personal existence.

Northwest Literature

Absolutely True Self-Portraits

Sherman Alexie’s novel The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian has many illustrations of characters, done by artist Ellen Forney, that not only give a physical representation of the characters, but also give annotated side-notes that show the main character’s feelings toward these characters. In our assignment, students had to complete a self portrait, then annotate the drawing with their own commontary about how they view themselves. Here are a few examples: